Trinidad Buljol (recipe)

Buljol

Salted codfish, tomatoes and the hottest peppers known to man. Probably not the most scintillating combination on paper, but believe me one taste and you -will- be hooked! Buljol is without a doubt one of my favorite breakfast foods. I love the way that the saltiness of the dried shredded cod plays off the cool wetness of the tomatoes and the spicy shreds of scotch bonnet peppers. It is a simple topping that needs little accompaniment. I often have it plain on buttered toast (as pictured above), or with some wholewheat bake or hops. If I’m feeling decadent I add chunks of creamy zaboca (avocado). YUM!

Factoid:
The name of this salad of shredded saltfish comes from the French brule, meaning burnt, and geule, slang for mouth. Since it is served at room temperature, the burning is obviously the result of the Congo pepper. Traditionally, buljol is served for breakfast or a Sunday brunch. – Dave DeWitt

According to Epicurious.com buljol is known in some other parts of the Caribbean as ‘Pick-Up Saltfish’. I have never heard of this term before so please let me know if this is accurate or not, and if so in which parts. My Jamaican mother says she never saw this dish before moving to Trinidad. Thanks!

Now I’ve seen recipes for buljol that include hardboiled eggs, lettuce and other strange (to me) ingredients -within- the buljol, rather than on the side. I don’t know (and feel free to let me know your variations) how common these versions are in the ‘real world’, I’ve certainly never had or seen them. To me the beauty of buljol is how simple and unadorned I know it to be. That’s why this is the recipe that I’ve decided to share :)


Recipe: (from Naparima Girls High School Cookbook)

Ingredients:

1/2 lb saltfish (salted cod)
1 or 2 large tomatoes, finely chopped
1/2 tsp fresh hot pepper, chopped
1 onion, finely chopped or sliced
1 sweet pepper, finely chopped (we don’t use sweet pepper in our version)
1 – 2 tbsp olive oil

Method:

1. Break fish in pieces and place in saucepan with cold water
2. Gradually heat to boiling and throw away water.
3. Repeat until fish tastes fresh and no longer salty
4. Remove skin and bones and break pieces of fish in even smaller pieces
5. Blend fish with remaining ingredients.

This post was originally published December 27, 2006. It has been updated once since then.

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Passionate foodie, founder of Trinigourmet and Caribbean Lifestyle Maven. Author of "Glam By Request: 30+ Easy Caribbean Recipes"

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  • http://www.gallimaufry.ws titilayo

    Oh, I love buljol so much! The ex-chossel likes it especially with some hard-boiled egg and avocado pear, either on the side or in the buljol itself (he said he first had it that way on a BWee breakfast flight). I’ve tried it with the hard-boiled egg, and it was good, but the avocado thing can’t work (I’m picky about how I combine different textures of food). I don’t think we have an equivalent in Barbados; the first time I encountered it was through my uncle, who picked up the recipe while he was studying in Trinidad.

  • http://www.gallimaufry.ws titilayo

    Oh, I love buljol so much! The ex-chossel likes it especially with some hard-boiled egg and avocado pear, either on the side or in the buljol itself (he said he first had it that way on a BWee breakfast flight). I’ve tried it with the hard-boiled egg, and it was good, but the avocado thing can’t work (I’m picky about how I combine different textures of food). I don’t think we have an equivalent in Barbados; the first time I encountered it was through my uncle, who picked up the recipe while he was studying in Trinidad.

  • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

    Hi Titilayo :) OMG it’s sooo good isn’t it? :D I had to giggle when you mentioned about textures tho cos I am the same way. There are some things that just seem ‘wrong’ in my mouth. Mario Batali refers to it as the ‘mouth feel’ of the dish, so I’m glad it’s deemed a legitimate grouse ;)

    Interesting that the all-in-one mixup buljol was one he first had on a BWEE flight :) I hope I get some more comments to see how common that variation really is! I don’t mind things on the side, but I guess I am a buljol purist/minimalist at heart :D (who knew there was such a thing!).

    Also hope I get some more feedback on this ‘Pick me Up Saltfish’ thing. You never know what to believe anymore! lolz! Cooking Light magazine did a feature on Caribbean food a few years back and would you believe they got 99% of the Jamaican and Trini dishes names and descriptions wrong. ACK!

    Ah feelin’ for buljol now… nyam nyam!

  • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

    Hi Titilayo :) OMG it’s sooo good isn’t it? :D I had to giggle when you mentioned about textures tho cos I am the same way. There are some things that just seem ‘wrong’ in my mouth. Mario Batali refers to it as the ‘mouth feel’ of the dish, so I’m glad it’s deemed a legitimate grouse ;)

    Interesting that the all-in-one mixup buljol was one he first had on a BWEE flight :) I hope I get some more comments to see how common that variation really is! I don’t mind things on the side, but I guess I am a buljol purist/minimalist at heart :D (who knew there was such a thing!).

    Also hope I get some more feedback on this ‘Pick me Up Saltfish’ thing. You never know what to believe anymore! lolz! Cooking Light magazine did a feature on Caribbean food a few years back and would you believe they got 99% of the Jamaican and Trini dishes names and descriptions wrong. ACK!

    Ah feelin’ for buljol now… nyam nyam!

  • http://chennette.wordpress.com Chennette

    I never liked buljol growing up – I still am picky about it, because it had lots of onions and sweet pepper that sometimes seemed to overpower everything else. And I don’t like raw onions or sweet pepper, so…I prefer it without sweet pepper, pimento peppers instead, and the onions have to be THINLY sliced, or slightly sauted for me to eat it.
    In Guyana they make “saltfish” which is more or less like a tomato choka with lots of saltfish – cooked together – this they eat with fry bakes (much heavier and sweeter than our bakes!)
    Does anyone eat fry bake and saltfish, where the saltfish pieces are deep fried crispy? We grew up eating this, and it’s a famiyl favourite, but I am not sure how many people do.

  • http://chennette.wordpress.com Chennette

    I never liked buljol growing up – I still am picky about it, because it had lots of onions and sweet pepper that sometimes seemed to overpower everything else. And I don’t like raw onions or sweet pepper, so…I prefer it without sweet pepper, pimento peppers instead, and the onions have to be THINLY sliced, or slightly sauted for me to eat it.
    In Guyana they make “saltfish” which is more or less like a tomato choka with lots of saltfish – cooked together – this they eat with fry bakes (much heavier and sweeter than our bakes!)
    Does anyone eat fry bake and saltfish, where the saltfish pieces are deep fried crispy? We grew up eating this, and it’s a famiyl favourite, but I am not sure how many people do.

  • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

    Like you i -hate- -hate- -HATE- raw sweet peppers. We don’t use them in our buljol and I don’t remember having buljol with it, but I don’t remember eating buljol outside my home much :)
    My mother dices the onions really fine to the point that I don’t even know it there. In fact I had to ask her if she put it cos it really is done fine, I’m sure you can’t see it in the above photo :D

    That guyanese ‘saltfish’ sounds quite interesting, gonna look up a recipe now! :) From what I’ve found some other islands have a dish that is called simply ‘saltfish’ that is some way they prepare duh ‘saltfish’ … no ‘pick me up saltfishes’ so far tho that resemble ‘buljol’ :)

    That description of fry bake and saltfish… I know I’ve had fried breadfruit with fried saltfish and I ADORE that :D maybe some homes make it with fry bake.. i only ever had fry bake when by my aunt or when in ‘country’ cos my mom is a health nut thus my wholewheat obsession. :D

    Saltfish is love. and buljol is love. oh yes. it is love :P

    • http://lilandra.com/blog Lilandra

      i never had buljol at home

      • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

        buljol is your friend :cry:

  • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

    Like you i -hate- -hate- -HATE- raw sweet peppers. We don’t use them in our buljol and I don’t remember having buljol with it, but I don’t remember eating buljol outside my home much :)
    My mother dices the onions really fine to the point that I don’t even know it there. In fact I had to ask her if she put it cos it really is done fine, I’m sure you can’t see it in the above photo :D

    That guyanese ‘saltfish’ sounds quite interesting, gonna look up a recipe now! :) From what I’ve found some other islands have a dish that is called simply ‘saltfish’ that is some way they prepare duh ‘saltfish’ … no ‘pick me up saltfishes’ so far tho that resemble ‘buljol’ :)

    That description of fry bake and saltfish… I know I’ve had fried breadfruit with fried saltfish and I ADORE that :D maybe some homes make it with fry bake.. i only ever had fry bake when by my aunt or when in ‘country’ cos my mom is a health nut thus my wholewheat obsession. :D

    Saltfish is love. and buljol is love. oh yes. it is love :P

    • http://lilandra.com/blog Lilandra

      i never had buljol at home

      • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

        buljol is your friend :cry:

  • mom

    Yes I do agree with you so that whenever I made Buljol and as it was also made by my mother was always salted codfish and onions with hot hot hot pepper. Anything else were sides , boiled eggs sliced , avocado slices, tomato slices and shredded cabbage as well. My mother also made a ground garlic and olive oil sauce to pour over it all when you had it on your plate. At that time we called it sweet oil and it was expensive so it was used in few dishes, not that it is any cheaper now .

    Also buljol was accompanied with potbakes, hops, or fried bakes. However I found my in-laws frying saltfish to eat with fried bakes and there was no love for buljol and thus my children love for fried saltfish and fried bakes which is really a trini central dish. So this instead of buljol was made to please my husband’s taste , hehehehe.
    Tomatoes and saltfish cooked together with onions , garlic and green seasoning and of course hot pepper is aso a favourite with my husband as is smoked herring cooked in a similar manner with tomatoes etc. Of course I love this with cornmeal dumplings steamed in coconut milk but he prefers rice and dhall with smoked herrings or saltfish and tomatoes.
    Take care.

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      MMMM mom you making me soooo HUNGRY@!! :D I am going to bookmark this comment so that I can try some of these things you’ve mentioned :D

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      mom! my mom loves your ‘sweet oil’ idea :) i think we’re gonna try next time we makin buljol :D Definitely trying the dumplings and coconut milk too… YUMMM!

  • mom

    Yes I do agree with you so that whenever I made Buljol and as it was also made by my mother was always salted codfish and onions with hot hot hot pepper. Anything else were sides , boiled eggs sliced , avocado slices, tomato slices and shredded cabbage as well. My mother also made a ground garlic and olive oil sauce to pour over it all when you had it on your plate. At that time we called it sweet oil and it was expensive so it was used in few dishes, not that it is any cheaper now .

    Also buljol was accompanied with potbakes, hops, or fried bakes. However I found my in-laws frying saltfish to eat with fried bakes and there was no love for buljol and thus my children love for fried saltfish and fried bakes which is really a trini central dish. So this instead of buljol was made to please my husband’s taste , hehehehe.
    Tomatoes and saltfish cooked together with onions , garlic and green seasoning and of course hot pepper is aso a favourite with my husband as is smoked herring cooked in a similar manner with tomatoes etc. Of course I love this with cornmeal dumplings steamed in coconut milk but he prefers rice and dhall with smoked herrings or saltfish and tomatoes.
    Take care.

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      MMMM mom you making me soooo HUNGRY@!! :D I am going to bookmark this comment so that I can try some of these things you’ve mentioned :D

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      mom! my mom loves your ‘sweet oil’ idea :) i think we’re gonna try next time we makin buljol :D Definitely trying the dumplings and coconut milk too… YUMMM!

  • mom

    I am glad you like and your Mom as well
    My regards to her
    Enjoy and take care

  • mom

    I am glad you like and your Mom as well
    My regards to her
    Enjoy and take care

  • mom

    Hi Sarina
    Have you ever made roasted saltfish buljol
    Saltfish is roasted over an open fire usually a coalpot or bbq pit or even on a gas stove(can be messy)and then pound and stripped and mixed with roasted bird peppers , garlic , onions and ground shadobenny(bandaniya). It is mixed well and then boiling hot oil is added to the mixture. One of my mother in law’s favourite dishes to be eaten with rice and dhall. A bit salty but after pounding and roasting most of the salt comes out but as an added extra it can be lightly washed after the roasting and pounding.
    Try and enjoy

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      i will give it a try mom :D guess what i got today? ROUCOU!!! :D :D :D :D :D Can’t wait to use it :D Gonna make a post about my adventure in the near future :D

  • mom

    Hi Sarina
    Have you ever made roasted saltfish buljol
    Saltfish is roasted over an open fire usually a coalpot or bbq pit or even on a gas stove(can be messy)and then pound and stripped and mixed with roasted bird peppers , garlic , onions and ground shadobenny(bandaniya). It is mixed well and then boiling hot oil is added to the mixture. One of my mother in law’s favourite dishes to be eaten with rice and dhall. A bit salty but after pounding and roasting most of the salt comes out but as an added extra it can be lightly washed after the roasting and pounding.
    Try and enjoy

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      i will give it a try mom :D guess what i got today? ROUCOU!!! :D :D :D :D :D Can’t wait to use it :D Gonna make a post about my adventure in the near future :D

  • mom

    Great for you , enjoy
    Take care

  • mom

    Great for you , enjoy
    Take care

  • squeezle

    Buljol is definitely one of my favourites, but I’ve never made the ‘real thing’ myself. Most of the versions I’ve had omit the sweet green pepper, even though I have no problem with it.

    However, I don’t have the patience to boil and pick through the saltfish, so I make a lazy man’s version by substituting canned tuna. It’s surprisingly tasty, especially after it sits in the fridge overnight. I like it on buttered toast, or a whole-wheat pita. Stuff like avocadoes and boiled eggs usually go on-the-side.

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      boiling and pickingthrough the saltfish is definitely a pain :) well more the picking than the boiling :) still i love the salty flavour so much! Do you find the tuna is fine as is or do you salt it additionally :) It is definitely an interesting ‘lazified’ version :) Never heard it before! I may just give it a try :)

      I’m’ glad to hear that you also put the accessories on the side :lol:

  • squeezle

    Buljol is definitely one of my favourites, but I’ve never made the ‘real thing’ myself. Most of the versions I’ve had omit the sweet green pepper, even though I have no problem with it.

    However, I don’t have the patience to boil and pick through the saltfish, so I make a lazy man’s version by substituting canned tuna. It’s surprisingly tasty, especially after it sits in the fridge overnight. I like it on buttered toast, or a whole-wheat pita. Stuff like avocadoes and boiled eggs usually go on-the-side.

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      boiling and pickingthrough the saltfish is definitely a pain :) well more the picking than the boiling :) still i love the salty flavour so much! Do you find the tuna is fine as is or do you salt it additionally :) It is definitely an interesting ‘lazified’ version :) Never heard it before! I may just give it a try :)

      I’m’ glad to hear that you also put the accessories on the side :lol:

  • squeezle

    Extra salt is essential in this one. It makes it taste more like the real thing.

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      that would depend on the saltiness of your saltfish :)

  • squeezle

    Extra salt is essential in this one. It makes it taste more like the real thing.

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      that would depend on the saltiness of your saltfish :)

  • daSunGod

    The ‘roasted saltfish’ that ‘mom’ described is what we Guyanese call SaltFish Choka which is an East Indian dish. Very similar to Bol Jol, this dish is combined with lots of roasted garlic and hot peppers and is bursting with smoky flaour and taste when perched upon hot Basmati rice and steaming Dhal. There’s nothing quite like it except, of course, Coconut Choka!
    BTW: I’m a Guyanese living in Barbados, and keeping the traditions.

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      thanks for sharing this :) I love chokas but I’ve never had a coconut one before :) care to share a recipe? ;) thanks for passing by, hope you’ll be back!

  • daSunGod

    The ‘roasted saltfish’ that ‘mom’ described is what we Guyanese call SaltFish Choka which is an East Indian dish. Very similar to Bol Jol, this dish is combined with lots of roasted garlic and hot peppers and is bursting with smoky flaour and taste when perched upon hot Basmati rice and steaming Dhal. There’s nothing quite like it except, of course, Coconut Choka!
    BTW: I’m a Guyanese living in Barbados, and keeping the traditions.

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      thanks for sharing this :) I love chokas but I’ve never had a coconut one before :) care to share a recipe? ;) thanks for passing by, hope you’ll be back!

  • Mad Q

    SO I’m doing a lil lime by my yard on sunday (London – UK) … this’ll be the 2nd one I’m doing .. and its gonna be a breakfast lime … last breakfast lime was strictly the Great British Fry-up … which will still be in attendance – along with some American styl;e items … its the Caribbean style I’m strugling with .. I’m from Barbados so apart from Bakes, Corn Beef Cakes I doan remember da much from my childhood … I always remember being in TnT wid muh step mother an eatin Bol Jol – hence me finding this site! … but I want sopme other Caribbean breakfast ideas .. ackee & saltfish perhaps …

    Anyone have any other ideas …??

    Thanks in advance!!

    Q

  • Mad Q

    SO I’m doing a lil lime by my yard on sunday (London – UK) … this’ll be the 2nd one I’m doing .. and its gonna be a breakfast lime … last breakfast lime was strictly the Great British Fry-up … which will still be in attendance – along with some American styl;e items … its the Caribbean style I’m strugling with .. I’m from Barbados so apart from Bakes, Corn Beef Cakes I doan remember da much from my childhood … I always remember being in TnT wid muh step mother an eatin Bol Jol – hence me finding this site! … but I want sopme other Caribbean breakfast ideas .. ackee & saltfish perhaps …

    Anyone have any other ideas …??

    Thanks in advance!!

    Q

  • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

    Hey Mad Q :) Why not check out my breakfast link for some ideas :) www.trinigourmet.com/index.php/category/breakfast/

    I highly recommend Jamaican festival – which is listed there.. :) I also have a recipe for ackee and saltfish if you want.

  • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

    Hey Mad Q :) Why not check out my breakfast link for some ideas :) www.trinigourmet.com/index.php/category/breakfast/

    I highly recommend Jamaican festival – which is listed there.. :) I also have a recipe for ackee and saltfish if you want.

  • caribman

    I was looking around on this site again and thought I would search for cabbage salad, trini shredded cabbage or raw cabbage. I make this almost every time I cook palau or saltfish, okra and rice.
    Cut a cabbage down the middle, two halfs. Take one half and shred it up, if the shreded cabbage strings are too long cut into two and place into a bowl. Cut a lime in two and squeeze 1/2 lime into the bowl. Add Olive Oil, black pepper and salt to taste. Enjoy!! Of Course, don’t forget the avocado (called ‘zaboca’ in Trinidad).

  • caribman

    I was looking around on this site again and thought I would search for cabbage salad, trini shredded cabbage or raw cabbage. I make this almost every time I cook palau or saltfish, okra and rice.
    Cut a cabbage down the middle, two halfs. Take one half and shred it up, if the shreded cabbage strings are too long cut into two and place into a bowl. Cut a lime in two and squeeze 1/2 lime into the bowl. Add Olive Oil, black pepper and salt to taste. Enjoy!! Of Course, don’t forget the avocado (called ‘zaboca’ in Trinidad).

  • http://caribbeangarden.blogspot.com Nicole

    Hi Sarina
    Once again your blog has inspired me. see
    caribbeangarden.blogspot.com/2007/09/roasted-saltfish-choka.html
    Digging around the internet there wasn’t a single recipe for roasted salt fish choka-an Indio-Trinidadian dish. In fact, I haven’t seen it made since childhood. So, inspired by the comment and childhood memories of my mother and elder sister preparing it, I decided to make and post the recipe before it’s lost to most. Indeed, my husband said he had never had the dish before!

  • http://caribbeangarden.blogspot.com Nicole

    Hi Sarina
    Once again your blog has inspired me. see
    caribbeangarden.blogspot.com/2007/09/roasted-saltfish-choka.html
    Digging around the internet there wasn’t a single recipe for roasted salt fish choka-an Indio-Trinidadian dish. In fact, I haven’t seen it made since childhood. So, inspired by the comment and childhood memories of my mother and elder sister preparing it, I decided to make and post the recipe before it’s lost to most. Indeed, my husband said he had never had the dish before!

  • http://www.starlenesattorneysite.cn Brenda

    I found your site quite by accident but like it

  • http://www.starlenesattorneysite.cn Brenda

    I found your site quite by accident but like it

  • Indra

    I believe Bruljol is strictly a Trinidad creation. We grew up eating it and it’s one of my family’s favorite dishes. We do make it with hard boild eggs and avacados and we don’t use sweet pepper. Also, we don’t heat the fish. We soak it for several hours and change the water a few times. We pronounce it buljou (bull-jow) but I don’t know if that’s correct. Oh well, however it’s spelled or pronounced, it sure is DELICIOUS!! :-)

    • toolsie_girl

      This is how our family has always eaten it. Always with the egg and avacado mixed in and never sweet pepper. Oh so good!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Indra

    I believe Bruljol is strictly a Trinidad creation. We grew up eating it and it’s one of my family’s favorite dishes. We do make it with hard boild eggs and avacados and we don’t use sweet pepper. Also, we don’t heat the fish. We soak it for several hours and change the water a few times. We pronounce it buljou (bull-jow) but I don’t know if that’s correct. Oh well, however it’s spelled or pronounced, it sure is DELICIOUS!! :-)

    • toolsie_girl

      This is how our family has always eaten it. Always with the egg and avacado mixed in and never sweet pepper. Oh so good!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Danielle

    I was lurking on the site and had to post. I’m from St. Thomas and we do refer to this version of saltfish as “Pick up saltfish”. We usually eat this with sides of advocado, hard boiled eggs, and maybe some butter bread. My mom is from Monserratt and she likes to eat hers with a cucumber salad as a side.

    There is another version that we do which is simply known as “saltfish”. With that version you cook the shredded saltfish with the usual onions and peppers in an oil and tomato based sauce and served with varying sides of dumplings, fungi, or ground provisions. It’s usually eaten for lunch or dinner.

    Hmmm…typing this is making me hungry.

  • Danielle

    I was lurking on the site and had to post. I’m from St. Thomas and we do refer to this version of saltfish as “Pick up saltfish”. We usually eat this with sides of advocado, hard boiled eggs, and maybe some butter bread. My mom is from Monserratt and she likes to eat hers with a cucumber salad as a side.

    There is another version that we do which is simply known as “saltfish”. With that version you cook the shredded saltfish with the usual onions and peppers in an oil and tomato based sauce and served with varying sides of dumplings, fungi, or ground provisions. It’s usually eaten for lunch or dinner.

    Hmmm…typing this is making me hungry.

  • Lioness

    Mommy from Carriacou…..we had this all de time….sometimes when meh lazy, meh go to de Trini place an buy….sooooooooo good!!!

  • Lioness

    Mommy from Carriacou…..we had this all de time….sometimes when meh lazy, meh go to de Trini place an buy….sooooooooo good!!!

  • Brian McLean

    Funny how the recipe’s vary. My mother, depending on how much effort she wanted to put into it, would make buljol with boiled eggs and small cubes of avocado in it. The key to this dish is the fresh out the oven bread. I make this every couple of months and it may last the day. One of my favorite dishes.

  • Brian McLean

    Funny how the recipe’s vary. My mother, depending on how much effort she wanted to put into it, would make buljol with boiled eggs and small cubes of avocado in it. The key to this dish is the fresh out the oven bread. I make this every couple of months and it may last the day. One of my favorite dishes.

  • anita

    Hi,
    When I was in Trinidad as a kid, had buljoi at tako restaurant in San Fernando near market on Kete and maybe mucurapo st. They had additional vegetable and wondering what it is? The bake I had was not fried and cook on metal plate. Love it and surprise that in Cda I oder bake and shock to discover it was fried. Learn hard way that there are two types.

    Miss that comforting food and would love to hear other recipes and that type of bake. Oh, owner of restaurant was Kangaloo or Kargaroo. Family member was mayor of San Fernando (I think) and daughter who is school teacher of Dorothy with daughter Debra. Appreciate contact info for kinda related to Dorothy. tx.

    PS: When Dorothy visited Cda, was foolish not to get contact details.
    Tx and appreciat help for recipe and any contact details.

  • anita

    Hi,
    When I was in Trinidad as a kid, had buljoi at tako restaurant in San Fernando near market on Kete and maybe mucurapo st. They had additional vegetable and wondering what it is? The bake I had was not fried and cook on metal plate. Love it and surprise that in Cda I oder bake and shock to discover it was fried. Learn hard way that there are two types.

    Miss that comforting food and would love to hear other recipes and that type of bake. Oh, owner of restaurant was Kangaloo or Kargaroo. Family member was mayor of San Fernando (I think) and daughter who is school teacher of Dorothy with daughter Debra. Appreciate contact info for kinda related to Dorothy. tx.

    PS: When Dorothy visited Cda, was foolish not to get contact details.
    Tx and appreciat help for recipe and any contact details.

  • anita

    Since it awaiting moderationn, Dorothy was school teacher at San Fernando Boys High school and retired. Please excuse spelling for use phonetic spelling.

  • anita

    Since it awaiting moderationn, Dorothy was school teacher at San Fernando Boys High school and retired. Please excuse spelling for use phonetic spelling.

  • Skinteeth

    there is so much variations on food in the Caribbean, and even within some Islands and where people live and who they live among. One thing one can be sure of anywhere in the world… your next door neighbor will be cooking the same thing differently

    “In Guyana they make “saltfish” which is more or less like a tomato choka with lots of saltfish – cooked together – this they eat with fry bakes (much heavier and sweeter than our bakes!)”

    In guyana it’s called fried saltfish stew saltfish or just saltfish. I thought most of the Caribbean had a variation on this. It’s actually COOKED with lots onions, and peppers AND some tomatoes, and you add your hot peppers according to your taste. But Guyanese Indians would have no clue what a Tomato Choka is as its not made there.

    In Guyana a Buljol, Bonjol or bunjol is a dry curry, or curried meat. I always thought bunjol was an Indian word because of it’s association in Guyana with the dry curry.

  • Skinteeth

    there is so much variations on food in the Caribbean, and even within some Islands and where people live and who they live among. One thing one can be sure of anywhere in the world… your next door neighbor will be cooking the same thing differently

    “In Guyana they make “saltfish” which is more or less like a tomato choka with lots of saltfish – cooked together – this they eat with fry bakes (much heavier and sweeter than our bakes!)”

    In guyana it’s called fried saltfish stew saltfish or just saltfish. I thought most of the Caribbean had a variation on this. It’s actually COOKED with lots onions, and peppers AND some tomatoes, and you add your hot peppers according to your taste. But Guyanese Indians would have no clue what a Tomato Choka is as its not made there.

    In Guyana a Buljol, Bonjol or bunjol is a dry curry, or curried meat. I always thought bunjol was an Indian word because of it’s association in Guyana with the dry curry.

  • Skinteeth

    Also stew Saltfish and Saltfish Choka are two completely different things

  • Skinteeth

    Also stew Saltfish and Saltfish Choka are two completely different things

  • Redz

    Has anyone tried it with diced cucumber? oh, it’s sooooo good!! I’m making it as we speak, along with some fry bake…..yummy…….who needs to wait until Sunday morning!

  • Redz

    Has anyone tried it with diced cucumber? oh, it’s sooooo good!! I’m making it as we speak, along with some fry bake…..yummy…….who needs to wait until Sunday morning!

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