Trinidad and Tobago Carnival: Part 8 – Ash Wednesday

This entry is part 8 of 9 in the series Trinidad and Tobago Carnival

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After the frenzied crescendo of Carnival Tuesday all merriment and debauchery ends (or is supposed to end) with the ushering in of Ash Wednesday and the start of the Roman Catholic observance of Lent. My father tells me that ‘back in the day’ all sound stopped at midnight and no calypso would play on the radio with the end of Carnival Tuesday. Things have definitely changed since then! Although you still see many individuals with ashes on their forehead heading to work, you are also equally as likely to see the throngs of people who take the day off work and head to the nation’s beaches for a ‘cooldown’.

SIGHTS:

The beach at Parlatuvier Bay, Tobago

www.flickr.com/photos/paulmannix/ / CC BY 2.0

 

SOUNDS:

Here you can see some video of Trinidad’s most popular beach, Maracas Bay. The little huts are concession stands, the most popular offering of which is ‘Shark n Bake’

TASTES:

Fried Fish n Bake
For many in Trinidad Ash Wednesday is a day for relaxing (or partying) at the beach. And, as mentioned above, the defacto beach snack here in TnT is Fried Fish n Bake :)

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  • Helen Kelshall

    That’s very true, and absolutely no calypsoes were played throughout the Lenten season.

  • Helen Kelshall

    That’s very true, and absolutely no calypsoes were played throughout the Lenten season.

  • Helen Kelshall

    That’s very true, and absolutely no calypsoes were played throughout the Lenten season.

  • Helen Kelshall

    Then there was St. Joseph’s day during Lent when calypsoes were allowed just for that day, don’t ask me why.

  • Helen Kelshall

    Then there was St. Joseph’s day during Lent when calypsoes were allowed just for that day, don’t ask me why.

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