Trinidad Chicken Chow Mein (recipe)

Trinidad Chicken Chow Mein

Chicken chow mein is a perennial fave of mine, especially with PLENTY of soy sauce :) It was another of the dishes that I made in February as part of my Year of the Pig menu :) Last year Trinidad celebrated the 200th Anniversary of Chinese Immigration to our country with a public holiday and a month of festivities that included dragon boat races and more. To learn more about the Chinese influence in Trinidad & Tobago you can see the official BiCentennial website here, it’s quite good!

Several months ago Trini food blogger ‘Can Cook Must Cook’ posed the provocative question “Is Chinee food ours?” … Personally I would say yes. Just because the flavours are different to what I find overseas and preserved sweet n sour fruits are an indelible part of the memory of many a Trini childhood. Having said that, Chinese food here is nowhere as fusion in result as for example the Chinese community in India or Chinese-Cuban cuisine. Still, the Chinese presence in India, for example, is 300 years strong, and who knows what Trini Chinese food will look and taste like in 2107? :lol:

What -is- interesting though, and may be the first step to a deeper form of fusion, is the number of eateries boasting ‘Chinese Creole’ food. This seems to be a fairly recent phenomenon but I may be wrong. Basically these establishments offer traditional Trinidadian creole dishes alongside the traditional Trinidadian-Chinese dishes cafeteria-style. This creates odd and very unique combinations on the plate to say the least!


Trinidad Chicken Chow Mein
——————————————————————————–

Recipe By: Naparima Girl’s High School Cookbook
Serving Size: 6

Ingredients:

1 whole chicken breast
2 tablespoons cooking oil
salt and b.pepper
2 carrots
1 christophene (cho cho/chayote)
1/2 head cabbage
1 package bean sprouts
1 clove garlic
soy sauce
1 package mein(egg) noodles
1 small cauliflower
1 large sweet pepper
1 medium onion

Trinidad Chicken Chow Mein

Directions:

1. Remove chicken skin and bone, cut meat in small pieces, season with salt, bl peppper and crushed garlic

Trinidad Chicken Chow Mein

2. Cut all vegetables in thin strips
3. Cook chicken in oil until cooked but not brown, add carrots and cauliflower, cover and cook 3 mins. Vegetables should be tender.

Trinidad Chicken Chow Mein

4. Add soy sauce to taste
5. If bean sprouts are to be used add at the end and steam 2 mins. on top of the mixture
6. Noodles: Boil until tender in salted water, drain, cool then fry in hot oil until crisp.

Trinidad Chicken Chow Mein

7. Drain. Serve with chicken and vegetables.

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Passionate foodie, founder of Trinigourmet and Caribbean Lifestyle Maven. Author of "Glam By Request: 30+ Easy Caribbean Recipes"

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  • Lilandra

    300 year old trini-chinese cuisine
    sounds…nice

    pity i won’t be alive to see it

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      drink yuh aloes, yuh never know! :D :lol:

      • Lilandra

        i can’t take the cricket suspense
        and i don’t drink no aloes!
        *sniffle*
        sri lanka
        rain

        • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

          i don’t understand cricket :) but food network coming May 1st :D

  • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

    drink yuh aloes, yuh never know! :D :lol:

  • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

    i don’t understand cricket :) but food network coming May 1st :D

  • http://www.tastesofguyana.blogspot.com Cynthia

    Hi Sarina, Thanks for stopping by my blog. Your visit is appreciated. Hope you’ll return often.

    This may sound silly but I just want to be absolutely clear. When you say to fry the noodles until crisp, you mean as in crunchy-crisp?

    One time, years ago when I ordered chicken chowmein in T’dad I was served a plate full of wonderful veggies and cut up chicken with crispy-crunchy bits of noodles scattered throughout the dish. This was the first time I had chowmein like this so it was an eye-opener. :) I am accustomed to the soft-noodle kind of chowmein. But I have been to Chinese restaurants in North America where they often ask when I order chowmein if I want the soft or crispy noodles.

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      hey cynthia! :D finally lured you over here :lol: how you going? I think I mean crunchy-crisp but not hard hard like dry ramen, yuh know? Just like a light toasting on the surface of the noodle :) Does that help?

  • http://www.tastesofguyana.blogspot.com Cynthia

    Hi Sarina, Thanks for stopping by my blog. Your visit is appreciated. Hope you’ll return often.

    This may sound silly but I just want to be absolutely clear. When you say to fry the noodles until crisp, you mean as in crunchy-crisp?

    One time, years ago when I ordered chicken chowmein in T’dad I was served a plate full of wonderful veggies and cut up chicken with crispy-crunchy bits of noodles scattered throughout the dish. This was the first time I had chowmein like this so it was an eye-opener. :) I am accustomed to the soft-noodle kind of chowmein. But I have been to Chinese restaurants in North America where they often ask when I order chowmein if I want the soft or crispy noodles.

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      hey cynthia! :D finally lured you over here :lol: how you going? I think I mean crunchy-crisp but not hard hard like dry ramen, yuh know? Just like a light toasting on the surface of the noodle :) Does that help?

  • http://www.tastesofguyana.blogspot.com Cynthia

    Hi Sarina, I’ve been lured for a long time, just never commented :) I am doing fine. Thanks for asking. And you?

    I saw and enjoyed your postcard at Jugalbandi. As I said in my comment there, it was great to see another Caribbean postcard. And the doubles pic was to die for. Did you make it yourself?

    Yes, the light-toasting of the noodle helps. Thanks.

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      yay well i’m glad you’re commenting now :) I’m doing OK. Tired and stuff (health issues) but trucking along :) I’m glad you liked the postcard at Jugalbandi :) I saw and liked yours as well… seeing fried plaintains always makes me weak in the knees :P Yes I made those doubles myself hehehe

      Btw, if you click ‘Reply to this comment’ on the comment you want to reply to (instead of the box at the bottom) it keeps all the replies together :) Really nifty!

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      yay well i’m glad you’re commenting now :) I’m doing OK. Tired and stuff (health issues) but trucking along :) I’m glad you liked the postcard at Jugalbandi :) I saw and liked yours as well… seeing fried plaintains always makes me weak in the knees :P Yes I made those doubles myself hehehe

      Btw, if you click ‘Reply to this comment’ on the comment you want to reply to (instead of the box at the bottom) it keeps all the replies together :) Really nifty!

  • http://www.tastesofguyana.blogspot.com Cynthia

    Hi Sarina, I’ve been lured for a long time, just never commented :) I am doing fine. Thanks for asking. And you?

    I saw and enjoyed your postcard at Jugalbandi. As I said in my comment there, it was great to see another Caribbean postcard. And the doubles pic was to die for. Did you make it yourself?

    Yes, the light-toasting of the noodle helps. Thanks.

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      yay well i’m glad you’re commenting now :) I’m doing OK. Tired and stuff (health issues) but trucking along :) I’m glad you liked the postcard at Jugalbandi :) I saw and liked yours as well… seeing fried plaintains always makes me weak in the knees :P Yes I made those doubles myself hehehe

      Btw, if you click ‘Reply to this comment’ on the comment you want to reply to (instead of the box at the bottom) it keeps all the replies together :) Really nifty!

  • http://www.aidanbrooks.blogspot.com Trig

    I’m sad to admit that, in Britatin, the term “Chow Mein” is more commonly associated with mass produced, generic, poor quality, salty sludge that’s mainly used by the cheap Chinese takeaway outlets. It’s a real shame that many people here (young and old) probably wouldn’t recognise an actual genuine chow mein dish. Your version on the other hand looks very unique and individual, and tasty I should add!

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      aw thanks T! :blush: i don’t remember ever having any Chinese food when i was in England. I have a lot of catching up to do when next I’m on your turf :D I remember being surprised that pizza was quite a sit-down affair over there (or at least in Birmingham :) ) …

  • http://www.aidanbrooks.blogspot.com Trig

    I’m sad to admit that, in Britatin, the term “Chow Mein” is more commonly associated with mass produced, generic, poor quality, salty sludge that’s mainly used by the cheap Chinese takeaway outlets. It’s a real shame that many people here (young and old) probably wouldn’t recognise an actual genuine chow mein dish. Your version on the other hand looks very unique and individual, and tasty I should add!

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      aw thanks T! :blush: i don’t remember ever having any Chinese food when i was in England. I have a lot of catching up to do when next I’m on your turf :D I remember being surprised that pizza was quite a sit-down affair over there (or at least in Birmingham :) ) …

  • http://www.goodluckdeluxe.com Tara

    OK, now how good does that recipe look?!

    I’m craving Chinese food all of a sudden…and that’s my least favorite cuisine!

  • http://www.goodluckdeluxe.com Tara

    OK, now how good does that recipe look?!

    I’m craving Chinese food all of a sudden…and that’s my least favorite cuisine!

  • Janice Swan

    Good recipe. A tip of Ve-Tsin also adds to the flavour.

  • Janice Swan

    Good recipe. A tip of Ve-Tsin also adds to the flavour.

  • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

    Thanks Janice. Unfortunately I have strong physical reactions to Ve-Tsin so cooking with it is an absolute no-no for me. I wrote about it (it’s more common than you may know) here -> www.trinigourmet.com/index.php/msg-and-me/

  • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

    Thanks Janice. Unfortunately I have strong physical reactions to Ve-Tsin so cooking with it is an absolute no-no for me. I wrote about it (it’s more common than you may know) here -> www.trinigourmet.com/index.php/msg-and-me/

  • http://trinigourmet.com shereen

    i totally agree all those salts are loaded with msg and is not good for us at all….

    shereen’s last blog post..Caramel Crunch Bars

  • http://trinigourmet.com shereen

    i totally agree all those salts are loaded with msg and is not good for us at all….

    shereen’s last blog post..Caramel Crunch Bars

  • http://www.redrocknoodlebar.com.au/ Red Rock

    Is there a better way to prepare this without all the MSG?
    My recent post Making Oodles from Noodles

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      Hi there, I have a strong sensitivity to MSG and have never had a reaction to this recipe. The only ingredient that may cause a problem for you is the soy sauce. Even then you can control the amount, and some brands are ‘better’ than others.

  • http://www.redrocknoodlebar.com.au/ Red Rock

    Is there a better way to prepare this without all the MSG?
    My recent post Making Oodles from Noodles

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      Hi there, I have a strong sensitivity to MSG and have never had a reaction to this recipe. The only ingredient that may cause a problem for you is the soy sauce. Even then you can control the amount, and some brands are ‘better’ than others.

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