Ciabatta Bread – an overview

Ciabatta Bread

“I feast on wine and bread, and feasts they are” – Michelangelo

As ‘ciabatta bread’ continues to be the #1 search term via which people stumble onto TriniGourmet.com I thought I’d dig up some more information about this increasingly popular bread! :)

If you are in a rush for a recipe – click here to see my step by step illustrated tutorial!

From Wikipedia:
Ciabatta is an Italian white bread made with wheat flour and yeast. The loaf is somewhat elongated, broad and flattish: in Italian ciabatta means ?˘‚ǨŔúslipper?˘‚Ǩ‚Ѣ. Since the late 1990s it has been popular across Europe and in the United States, and is widely used as a sandwich bread.
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It is not clear where in Italy this kind of bread was first produced, and at least one type of ciabatta can be found in nearly every region of Italy. The ciabatta from the area encompassing Lake Como has a crisp crust, a somewhat soft, porous texture, and is light to the touch. The ciabatta found in Tuscany, Umbria, and Marche varies from bread that has a firm crust and dense crumb, to bread that has a crisper crust and more open texture. The more open-crumbed form, which is usual in the United States, is made from a very wet dough, often requiring machine-kneading, and a sourdough starter.
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There are many variations of ciabatta. When made with whole wheat flour, it is known as ciabatta integrale. In Rome, it is often seasoned with olive oil, salt, and marjoram. When milk is added to the dough, it becomes ciabatta latte.
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A toasted sandwich made from small loaves of ciabatta is known as a panino (plural panini).

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  • http://www.aidanbrooks.blogspot.com Trig

    Funny – that was just was I was thinking about yesterday, so I made this.

    Happy cooking, happy eating and a happy Easter, Sarina.

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      damn that looks good! now i’m hungry :) can’t eat any bread until passover ends… i don’t do easter T

  • http://www.aidanbrooks.blogspot.com Trig

    Funny – that was just was I was thinking about yesterday, so I made this.

    Happy cooking, happy eating and a happy Easter, Sarina.

    • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

      damn that looks good! now i’m hungry :) can’t eat any bread until passover ends… i don’t do easter T

  • Debbie

    Hello, and thank you for posting this recipe of Ciabatta bread! I do have a question before trying it. When you bring out the baking stone that has been heated, and you transfer the raised bread to the stone, doesn’t it cause the bread to fall again? Do you just bake it?
    I have a pita bread recipe that uses the baking stone like this, but bread deflates when you disturb it.
    Thank you :) Deb

  • Debbie

    Hello, and thank you for posting this recipe of Ciabatta bread! I do have a question before trying it. When you bring out the baking stone that has been heated, and you transfer the raised bread to the stone, doesn’t it cause the bread to fall again? Do you just bake it?
    I have a pita bread recipe that uses the baking stone like this, but bread deflates when you disturb it.
    Thank you :) Deb

  • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

    Debbie – I’ve found the dough of this bread is so sticky that I just transfer it with the foil or sheet that I had it rising on, onto the stone… rather than trying to move the risen doughs

  • http://www.TriniGourmet.com Sarina

    Debbie – I’ve found the dough of this bread is so sticky that I just transfer it with the foil or sheet that I had it rising on, onto the stone… rather than trying to move the risen doughs

  • judy blades

    just a question;
    first time ciabatta maker. just made the sponge and am afraid i’ve blown it already. though followed the directions exactly, final product not looking like a sponge, but rather stiff dough. Is it supposed to be more watery? Is the sponge anything like a sour dough starter?
    Thanks for your help
    jb

  • judy blades

    just a question;
    first time ciabatta maker. just made the sponge and am afraid i’ve blown it already. though followed the directions exactly, final product not looking like a sponge, but rather stiff dough. Is it supposed to be more watery? Is the sponge anything like a sour dough starter?
    Thanks for your help
    jb

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